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How to get days and nights sorted out for your baby

Written by Super User. Posted in Blog

BLOG -_Newborn_Day_Night_Reversal

It is common for our littlest clients to have day/night reversals. When babies are born, they have not yet developed an internal clock, known as their circadian rhythm. Waking is driven by hunger and because their stomachs are so tiny, they need to eat often. Think about how much growth a newborn goes through in those first few months, both physically and cognitively. A newborn infant looks vastly different than their four month old counterpart, both in size and their cognitive function. There is an amazing amount of development that happens in those short months.

One of the developments that happens after those first few months, around the third to fourth month of life is the development of a circadian rhythm, mediated by secretion of hormones from a part of their brain called the pineal gland.

Before this, the sleep wake cycle is a constant repetition of a little bit of awake time (45 minutes at a time for newborns) that will include all care giving, feeding, and socializing and then back to sleep again. Parents often find themselves with a baby that is more alert at night as opposed to daytime and this can be difficult as our circadian rhythms are telling us that it is time for some shut-eye at midnight, not party time!

Here are some things to consider and implement to switch back to a day/night rhythm that works for everyone:

1. Notice if your baby is getting over stimulated during the day and prefers to “wake up” at night during the quieter hours. If so, dial back the visitors and outings during the day to allow them to have a calmer more peaceful daytime environment to take in.

2. At night and during the day, keep your baby’s sleep environment quiet and calm.

3. Encourage regular and frequent feeding during the day, especially in the early evening when it’s common to see “cluster feeding” occur.

4. Do your best to achieve some awake time during the day, working on keeping your baby awake during feeding to both achieve that awake time and also promote active feeding where milk is being efficiently taken.

5. During the night, do your best to keep the feeding very calm and quiet. Keep the lights low and the interactions to a minimum. Even eye contact can signal a baby to alert and wake up promoting more wakefulness at night.

6. Get outside during the day and expose your baby to daylight. While they may not be producing melatonin just yet, it’s a good practice to establish and fresh air is good for everyone (including parents!).

Persist with these changes for a few days to a week to help your baby differentiate day time and night time.